Stevei Houkamau

Stevei Houkamau

Houkamu’s work reflects the influence of her whakapapa (genealogy). A strong integration of Maori and Pacific Island patterns that derive from ta moko and tatau (tattoo) are present in her works. She shows the intricacies of these patterns and the tactile nature of the marks of the uku in contrast with the bold, simple shapes and forms.

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Cityzenkane

Cityzenkane

English 3D artist and festival guest, Cityzenkane, begins his collaboration with local Uku ceramic artist, Stevei Houkamau at Toi Poneke on Monday February 27th.

The resulting artwork(s) will be attached to the side of a building in Wellington as a permanent work. We will put out the location of this building shortly before the work is installed.

On Wednesday March 2nd Cityzenkane will lead a workshop in clay with artists from Vincent’s Art Workshop, Pablo’s Art Studios and Alpha Art at the Museum of Wellington. The fruits of this workshop will be fired and installed at the Museum in March.

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Tagging in the Capital City

Tagging in the Capital City

Written by Bruce Mahalski

The old male bear reared up on its hind legs and sank its claws deep into the old pine tree and then raked them sharply down the trunk with a loud splintering noise. He sat on his haunches and sniffed the air. This was his forest. This was his tree. This was his signal to any other bears that passed this way. An invitation to females and a warning to other males

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Inverlochy Place

Inverlochy Place

Currently, there are limited sites around Wellington where emerging street artists can practise without asking for permission. Inverlochy Place (144 Abel Smith Street) became one of those sites when Rod Baxter, a youth worker with an interest in street art asked permission of his then landlord in 2013 if artists were able to paint on the brick wall on the west side of the street.

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2016 Exhibition

2016 Exhibition

Vivid’s exhibition celebrated Wellington Boys & Girls Institute’s Can Control programme, exhibited three emerging artists Onyx Karati, Leon Hohepa & Jaiden Matine, and highlighted the works involved in Vivid’s 2016 Festival.

Wellington Boys’ and Girls’ Institute (BGI) has been creatively responding to what local youth need since 1882. In recent years, BGI’s developed a programme for emerging young artists called ‘Can Control’. The programme creates groups of young artists aged 12-24 who have an interest in street art. The name ‘Can Control’ refers both to the technique of mastering a spray can and also the fact that young people can control, and choose to channel their talents into constructive community artworks.

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