Stevei Houkamau

Stevei Houkamau

Houkamu’s work reflects the influence of her whakapapa (genealogy). A strong integration of Maori and Pacific Island patterns that derive from ta moko and tatau (tattoo) are present in her works. She shows the intricacies of these patterns and the tactile nature of the marks of the uku in contrast with the bold, simple shapes and forms.

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Cityzenkane

Cityzenkane

English 3D artist and festival guest, Cityzenkane, begins his collaboration with local Uku ceramic artist, Stevei Houkamau at Toi Poneke on Monday February 27th.

The resulting artwork(s) will be attached to the side of a building in Wellington as a permanent work. We will put out the location of this building shortly before the work is installed.

On Wednesday March 2nd Cityzenkane will lead a workshop in clay with artists from Vincent’s Art Workshop, Pablo’s Art Studios and Alpha Art at the Museum of Wellington. The fruits of this workshop will be fired and installed at the Museum in March.

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Tagging in the Capital City

Tagging in the Capital City

Written by Bruce Mahalski

The old male bear reared up on its hind legs and sank its claws deep into the old pine tree and then raked them sharply down the trunk with a loud splintering noise. He sat on his haunches and sniffed the air. This was his forest. This was his tree. This was his signal to any other bears that passed this way. An invitation to females and a warning to other males

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Inverlochy Place

Inverlochy Place

Currently, there are limited sites around Wellington where emerging street artists can practise without asking for permission. Inverlochy Place (144 Abel Smith Street) became one of those sites when Rod Baxter, a youth worker with an interest in street art asked permission of his then landlord in 2013 if artists were able to paint on the brick wall on the west side of the street.

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2016 Exhibition

2016 Exhibition

Vivid’s exhibition celebrated Wellington Boys & Girls Institute’s Can Control programme, exhibited three emerging artists Onyx Karati, Leon Hohepa & Jaiden Matine, and highlighted the works involved in Vivid’s 2016 Festival.

Wellington Boys’ and Girls’ Institute (BGI) has been creatively responding to what local youth need since 1882. In recent years, BGI’s developed a programme for emerging young artists called ‘Can Control’. The programme creates groups of young artists aged 12-24 who have an interest in street art. The name ‘Can Control’ refers both to the technique of mastering a spray can and also the fact that young people can control, and choose to channel their talents into constructive community artworks.

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Wellington Street Art

Wellington Street Art

Street Art is the latest international art movement on a par with previous art movements such as Pop Art and Surrealism. In the last two decades it has transcended its original formats ( graffiti, bombing and mural art)  and established itself as a new medium entirely. This new creative force is currently exploding in all sorts of positive directions in a neighborhood near you.

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Graffiti versus Street Art – A History

Graffiti versus Street Art – A History

Human beings seem to have a strong impulse to leave their mark. To tell the world that they were here. Unlike other animals we know we’re going to die and leaving some sort of physical mark behind is one way of ensuring our symbolic survival. Of course animals mark their territories too with scent and claw marks, urine and faeces, but humans appear to have an obvious long term intent beyond the marking of territory or the finding of a mate. And perhaps these drives also play their part in our activities.

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This Wall Intentionally Left Blank

This Wall Intentionally Left Blank

Tagging is a curse for many building owners.  The City Council’s Graffiti Programme responds to around 1200 incidents of tagging a month and painting over this graffiti costs greater Wellington ratepayers over half a million dollars every year.

One way to combat graffiti attacks is to commission a local  street artist or muralist.

Many building owners are surprised that there are many qualified artists who will paint something colorful and beautiful on their building for a similar price to what  a professional painting company would charge  to paint the wall grey (or any other color). Many artists are reactive to the situation and the history of the structure they are painting on and happy to produce work in consultation with the building’s owner. A site-specific work can be an aid in branding your building or business and even adding value. Instead of just a street number its now the building with the giant elephant painted on it!

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Ellen Coup – Interview with Bruce Mahalski

Ellen Coup – Interview with Bruce Mahalski

If you live in Wellington you will be familiar with Ellen Coup’s art work whether you know her name or not. Ellen is a forty-four year old prolific mural painter who was born in Christchurch but now lives in Raumati. She specializes in scenes depicting New Zealand’s flora and fauna – at least this has been the subject matter of many of her well-known murals. Bruce Mahalski recently had a coffee and a chat with Ellen and asked her about her work.

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